Define A Good Life

By Vivienne Amijee

I do not know much about other school systems, but in Kenya, where I spent most of my life, a bell ringing meant the end of one period/class, the start of another or break/snack time. Break time bell was the best because it meant play time, eating time, gossip time and stuff that was actually fun,  not just listening to a teacher going on and on about course work. Were those the best days, where the only responsibility was being obedient? I wonder.

That was back in Primary and Secondary school, then campus came along and the bells stopped. The only thing you could rely on was your alarm clock to wake you up in the morning. At that point in your life when you realise it is all on you – freedom and responsibility, unlimited edition. Where those the good days, when the biggest responsibilities were going to class and calling home for more allowance? Everything comes in phases, so this too comes to an end and it is time to face the real world.

Life after graduation is depicted to be a garden of roses, not many are ready for the real deal: job hunting, paying bills, starting a family etc. Years go by and you realise you spent most of your life in school and had little time to discover your hobbies. You put away a little money for exploring but needs keep popping up left, right and centre, which means you have to postpone your adventures. There really isn’t any manual to what a good or perfect life is should be.

You end up having a great house, brilliant children and academic accolades, but you still feel that fire for more within you. Maybe Abraham Maslow was right, maybe we never get to realise self-actualisation – but it would surely be great to get to a point when everything feels in control.

Life is a roller-coaster ride: it’s spherical, it keeps going on. Whether you fall, whether you stumble, whether you trip, whether you lose, whether you win, it goes on until you take your last breath.

While we are still here, we need to silence the voice of defeat, surround ourselves with those who challenge us to be better, have a confidant who commiserates and celebrates with you, pray often and laugh as much as possible. It does not get easy, we just get tougher. Don’t be too serious, make beautiful memories. 🙂

About Teakisi 239 Articles
Teakisi (formerly ElleAfrique) is an English and French blogzine dedicated to challenging and changing the perceptions of African girls and women in the world today.

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